Zambia Backs US’s Call For Reform Of The UN Security Council

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WASHINGTON DC- September 28, 2017 - Foreign Affairs Minister Harry Kalaba has said Zambia supports United States President Donald Trump’s call, for the need to reform the United Nations Security Council. Mr. Kalaba emphasised however, that Zambia would like to see a more holistic approach, from an African perspective on the reforms, so that the global body can effectively meet the needs of African countries.

Mr. Kalaba said almost a third of UN membership consists of African States, yet no country from the continent is part of key decision-making, hence the need to have some with a Permanent Seat at the Security Council. The five permanent members or the Big Five are China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

The Minister was speaking when he held a meeting with Mr Joel Hellman, Dean of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington where he also addressed students at the School.

Meanwhile, Mr. Hellman, a former employee of the World Bank for 15 years, suggested that stronger African representation also be extended to other multilateral institutions such as the World Bank and the International so that their governing structures can better meet aspirations of African countries.

“There is need to strengthen the African voice and shareholding on these Bretton Woods Institutions and other regional banks to accelerate development in most African countries. We also believe that our universities should respond to the challenges facing African students,” said Mr Hellman.

He urged African students to take keen interest in courses dealing with global governance and international peace and security, to help fill up vacancies in these multi-lateral institutions. He said Zambia is positioned to take leadership in creating strategic partnerships with universities in USA in areas of education and research.

And addressing students, Mr. Kalaba’s lecture outlined key elements of Zambia’s Foreign Policy, which he said is guided by various principles including, fundamental rights and freedoms, self-determination, non-discrimination, national security, promotion of democratic principles and good neighbourliness among others. He explained that this policy has also evolved over time due to regional and international dynamics.

The minister also affirmed the cordial relations between Zambia and the United States which spans from Zambia’s independence in 1964, when the American consulate in Lusaka was elevated to an Embassy.

“For many years, Zambia has worked closely with the United States to promote economic growth and development, and to bring about political reform by promoting democratic principles and Governance systems that promote accountability. We also laud the support rendered to our Government’s effort to fight against corruption,” he said.

He said Zambia is an active participant in the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The initiative is helping Zambia to strengthen and scale up existing HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and care services, as well as build capacity for long-term sustainability and innovation.

Mr. Kalaba commended staff at Georgetown University for their tireless efforts in educating and inspiring the young minds and wished the students success in their studies.